Tower Magic

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Tower Magic, or "Chain Attack", is the predominant form of magic used in Mage Towers and was invented and employed chiefly during the Mage Wars.

Chain Attack

A Mage Tower consists of a hollow central chamber with a wide spiral staircase winding up the inside. Each step may be anywhere from a few square feet to over a hundred. The steps form permenant Ritual sites for the mages, who together cast a spell. A tower might be built on a mountain, or at the center of a plain, or on a rocky coast, or in a marsh, or anywhere else a single tower might be built.

The mages are arranged according to strength, with the strongest, the Arch Magus, at the very top and the weakest at the bottom. The mage at the bottom begins a spell, and sends it up to the next, who adds to it, and so on.

In Tower Magic, the Arch Magus must carefully control the power of the spell, hence his position at the top. If he is not precise enough, he can drain the life of his weaker mages.

This was sometimes regarded as a "tactic", with the Marcon Alliance sacrificing hundreds of mages to cast their most powerful spells.

Spells

Spells used in Chain Attack began simply by scailing up single-mage spells. Massive fireballs were common, along with any basic elemental attack.

Eventualy, multi-mage ritual spells were adapted, along with new spells invented specifically for tower-use. These included anti-tower techniques against enemy towers, as well as massive area-effect attacks impossible with conventional magic.

History

The use of Tower Magic was invented at High Tower sometime around B.G.A. 3700, with Nathan Searlin credited as the creator.

Eventually, multi-mage ritual spells were adapted, along with new spells invented specifically for tower-use. These included anti-tower techniques against enemy towers, as well as massive area-effect attacks impossible with conventional magic. The Mage Tower was the dominant force in that era: nearly everyone used it, if it wanted to become powerful. To this day, there are legends of heroes who had either to storm or infiltrate some Mage Tower or its territory, to capture a treasure, destroy a magic-amplifier, or expel some hostile sorcerer from their neighborhood; less than 1% of those who tried, even got halfway into enemy territory.

After the Wars came to an end, the practice almost ceased, over the next century, though the idea of multi-mage ritual spells did not. Some iterations of the Grey Temple and its daughter-organization, the Dark Order, used a similar style; but without a tower, they never duplicated the full power of the art.